Category Archives: Early Modern Culture

Thomas Nashe Conference: London

Thomas Nashe: Prose, Drama, and the Oral Culture of Early Modern London

An AHRC funded event jointly organised by The Thomas Nashe Project and Shakespeare’s Globe.

Saturday 20th May 2017

The Thomas Nashe Project is hosting a one-day symposium exploring the relationship between prose and drama, orality and print (and much more)!

The day will conclude with a ‘Read Not Dead’ staged reading of Thomas Nashe’s unsettling and disturbing prose work, Terrors of the Night, a story of nightmares and evil spirits told by candlelight in The Sam Wanamaker Playhouse.

The reading will be directed by Dr Tom Cornford (Royal Central School of Speech and Drama). The script has been adapted by Dr Kate De Rycker (Newcastle University), who will also introduce it.

You are welcome to come to either event or both.

The symposium is free but registration is necessary. Please contact Prof. Andrew Hadfield, University of Sussex (a.hadfield@sussex.ac.uk).

Tickets for the Read not Dead event (£20; £10) can be bought from Globe Education:

http://www.shakespearesglobe.com/education/events/symposia-conferences/thomas-nashehttp://www.shakespearesglobe.com/education/events/symposia-conferences/thomas-nashe

British Library: Online Literary Manuscripts

Online exhibitions include:

  • Literary manuscripts (this online exhibition displays important literary manuscripts from medieval times to the work of Austen, Blake, Wilde and Lewis Carroll);
  • Historical texts from ancient China to works by Elizabeth I and The Communist Manifesto.
  • Key documents related to Henry VIII (with videos and interactive texts).

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The British Library

Picture credit: Nic McPhee on Flickr / Creative Commons

Martin Luther: 500 Years

2017 will mark the 500th anniversary of the celebrated Ninety-five Theses that Luther affixed to the church doors in Wittenberg. It’s only with a broad brush-stroke that one could claim that this will be the 500th anniversary of The Reformation, but 2017 is as good a date as any to mark one of the great turning points in European (and subsequently world) history.

As is to be expected, there will be a rush of associated publications. We have already had Brand Luther on Luther and the printing press and now there is a biography from the distinguished historian Lyndal Roper: Martin Luther: Renegade and Prophet
(the review is positive about the book but somewhat negative about Luther).

The anniversary is also responsible for the Playmobil (it’s like Lego) Luther that is now in my office and that’s become a best-selling toy. I purchased it along with a Luther comic book on a recent trip to Germany. Actually I purchased two copies of the comic and my nephew who is studying Renaissance and Reformation history at school will have to pretend to be happy to get it.

VLUU L200  / Samsung L200
The doors of the church in Wittenberg

Dan Brown makes donation to Amsterdam’s Bibliotheca Philosophica Hermetica

Da Vinci Code author gives money to help the Bibliotheca Philosophica Hermetica in Amsterdam make collection available online to ‘people around the world’

Report in The Guardian

The Ritman Library has extensive holdings on the history of magic, gnosticism and alchemy and is open to the public (although at the moment it’s closed as they are relocating).

Link to The Ritman Library, Amsterdam

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