Duke of Buckingham

A portrait of the Duke of Buckingham, a favourite of King James VI and I has recently been rediscovered. The Duke played a controversial part in both the private and public life of the monarch before he was assassinated in 1628.

www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-41373007

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Drink jij geregeld koffie en spreek je naast Nederlands ook Engels?

Drink jij geregeld koffie en spreek je naast Nederlands ook Engels? Dan is dit experiment iets voor jou!

Wij doen een studie naar het effect van cafeïne op reactietijd.. Als je meedoet krijg je ofwel een capsule met cafeïne (3 mg per kilo lichaamsgewicht), of een capsule met een placebo. Bijvoorbeeld, als je 65 kilo weegt, krijg je 195 mg cafeïne, wat overeenkomt met 2 kopjes koffie. Om je veiligheid te garanderen zal je nooit meer cafeïne binnenkrijgen dan wat  de Europese Voedselveiligheidsauthoriteit heeft bepaald als veilig om dagelijks te consumeren. Elke participant hoeft maar één keer een sessie van 1.5 uur te doen. Het experiment bestaat uit een serie reactietijdexperimenten voor en na cafeïne inname, een kleine enquête, en een Engelse taaltest. Alle experimenten zullen in de multimediazalen van het Harmoniegebouw plaatsvinden.

Voorwaarden om mee te doen

  • Je eerste taal is Nederlands
  • Je hebt geen medische aandoeningen, en in het bijzonder geen intolerantie voor cafeïne
  • Je drinkt geregeld koffie, maar niet extreem veel (Niet meer dan 4 koppen per dag gemiddeld)
  • Je bent tussen de 18 en 25 jaar oud
  • Je bent bereid alle vormen van cafeïne 24 uur voor het experiment op te geven
  • Je bent bereid tot 12 uur na het experiment geen koffie te drinken
  • Je bent rechtshandig

Als je geïnteresseerd bent, vul dan alsjeblieft de korte enquête op Qualtrics in op

https://qtrial2017q1az1.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_elE0Y3adnYS9lul

Voel je vrij een email te sturen naar jellebrouwer96@gmail.com indien je nog vragen hebt.

Stephen Greenblatt: Original Sinner?

It makes sense that Cultural Studies has succeeded the New Historicism at the top of the humanities heap, because it’s even more unserious, even more indefinable, even more open to recherché (not to say inane and capricious) topics of “study”; to an even greater extent than the New Historicists, the typical practitioner of Cultural Studies combines a breathtaking cultural and historical illiteracy with a tendency to lean on pseudo-radical tropes about Western imperialism and so forth. In sum, it’s an intellectual and scholarly disaster. And its spiritual father is Stephen Greenblatt.

Stephen Greenblatt is one of the best know literary critics and the editor of The Norton Anthology. Not everone is a fan though.

Article in New Criterion

New Professor of Modern English Literature

prof. dr. R.D.P. (Richard) Lansdown

There is a new face in the English Department. Prof. Richard Lansdowne has joined the staff having come from Australia. Born in the UK and educated at UCL, he is an expert on Romantic literature and has written extensively in this area. He is particularly interested in Austen, Byron, Keats, Shelley and Wordsworth. In his sojourn in Australia he also developed research interests in western ideas of the Pacific. He is readjusting his ideas of Geography to encompass the province of Groningen.

Historical Fiction

Dame Hilary Mantel is roughly half way through her Reith Lectures on BBC Radio 4.  Best known for her Tudor novels Wolf Hall and Bring up the Bodies (both of which won the Man Booker Prize) Mantel reflects on the nature of historical fiction and whether the genre requires special defense.

The podcasts of the lectures and their transcripts can be found here. Students will be unsuprised to learn that this talented author has Irish roots.

Image result for hilary mantel wolf hall

Critical Thinking

Thinking like a scientist is really hard, even for scientists. It requires putting aside your own prior beliefs, evaluating the quality and meaning of the evidence before you, and weighing it in the context of earlier findings. But parking your own agenda and staying objective is not the human way.

Link: 5 Reasons It’s So Hard To Think Like A Scientist

One of the things that this article warns about is the seduction of anecdotal evidence. I’ll give some of that now.

It seems to me that some students treat simple texts as if they were simplistic and obvious. A text that offers a quick interpretation is often more poorly analysed than an obviously challenging one. Parts of courses (or instructions) that seem clear are often ignored.

5 Reasons It’s So Hard To Think Like A Scientist

Lilian Tabois: York Scholarship

Lilian Tabois, one of our graduates (MA, 2011), but better known to current students for having taught as a docent for part of this academic year, will leave for the University of York in the summer. She has been awarded a PhD scholarship for a dissertation on historiography and travel in British women’s  writing between 1780 and 1845. We wish her the best of luck in returning to full-time study.

GUTS: The Deep Blue Sea

Image may contain: one or more people, people standing, ocean, sky, text, outdoor and water

The Deep Blue Sea by Terence Rattigan

Der Aa Theater, 22-24 June

TICKETS | €7 for students, €9 for non-students

Trailer: https://youtu.be/4isLyvO8y5k

GUTS brings Terence Rattigan’s heart-wrenching and most-celebrated play to the Groningen stage. The Deep Blue Sea, set in England in the 1950s, highlights the struggles and despair of a failed marriage, of infidelity and in particular the question of identity with brutal and raw honesty.

The cast & crew include several current or past members of the English department. Cast: Pleun van Engelen (Hester Collyer), James Robert Lyon (Freddie Page), Emmet Godfrey (William Collyer), Elsemiek Hes (Mrs Elton), Johan Stapert (Mr Miller), Aubrey Williams (Philip Welch), Femke Nagelhout (Ann Welch), and Samuel Stevens (Jackie Jackson). Crew: Melissa Rolink, Jan Hein Dikkers, Marjon Vosmeijer, and Berber Aardema.

www.facebook.com/gutsdeepbluesea

Bob Dylan and Homer

Bob Dylan has delivered his Nobel Prize speech just in time to collect the prize money. He has conveniently (for our first year course on literary contexts) demonstrated the ongoing influence of Classical literature in his references to The Odyssey. He also refers to Moby Dick and John Donne.

For coverage of links to a text file or an audio file of the speech see www.nobelprize.org

Ulysses 2nd cent BC
Ulysses