Booker Prize for Lincoln Novel

Image result for lincoln in the bardoThe Man Booker Prize, which is worth £50,000,  has been won by George Saunders for his novel Lincoln in the Bardo. This is the first novel from an American writer who previously published short stories. The novel is based around the funeral of Abraham Lincoln’s eleven year old son.

‘The form and style of this utterly original novel, reveals a witty, intelligent, and deeply moving narrative. This tale of the haunting and haunted souls in the afterlife of Abraham Lincoln’s young son paradoxically creates a vivid and lively evocation of the characters that populate this other world. Lincoln in the Bardo is both rooted in, and plays with history, and explores the meaning and experience of empathy.’ – Baroness Young, chair of the judging panel.

See http://themanbookerprize.com/fiction

 

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Staff Publication: Joyce and Law

Dr Tekla Mecsnober’s chapter on Joyce and law has just been published in a volume from The Florida James Joyce series.

Making the case that legal issues are central to James Joyce’s life and work, international experts in law and literature offer new insights into Joyce’s most important texts. They analyze Dubliners, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Giacomo Joyce, Ulysses, and Finnegans Wake in light of the legal contexts of Joyce’s day.   (Publisher’s Description).

Poetry & Politics: A Minister Reads Kipling

The British ambassador to Burma was forced to stop Boris Johnson mid-sentence as he recited a colonial poem in the country’s most sacred temple… Rudyard Kipling’s Mandalay is written through the eyes of a retired British serviceman in Burma and also references kissing a local girl.

from The Independent

The Guardian

Students will know Kipling from the first year syllabus where his poem ‘The White Man’s Burden’ appears.

‘Mandalay’

By the old Moulmein Pagoda, lookin’ lazy at the sea,
There’s a Burma girl a-settin’, and I know she thinks o’ me;
For the wind is in the palm-trees, and the temple-bells they say:
“Come you back, you British soldier; come you back to Mandalay!”
Come you back to Mandalay,
Where the old Flotilla lay:
Can’t you ‘ear their paddles chunkin’ from Rangoon to Mandalay?
On the road to Mandalay,
Where the flyin’-fishes play,
An’ the dawn comes up like thunder outer China ‘crost the Bay!

‘Er petticoat was yaller an’ ‘er little cap was green,
An’ ‘er name was Supi-yaw-lat-jes’ [Burmese queen] the same as Theebaw’s Queen,
An’ I seed her first a-smokin’ of a whackin’ white cheroot,
An’ a-wastin’ Christian kisses on an ‘eathen idol’s foot:
Bloomin’ idol made o’ mud
Wot they called the Great Gawd Budd [i.e. Buddha]
Plucky lot she cared for idols when I kissed ‘er where she stud!
On the road to Mandalay…

When the mist was on the rice-fields an’ the sun was droppin’ slow,
She’d git ‘er little banjo an’ she’d sing Kulla-lo-lo!
With ‘er arm upon my shoulder an’ ‘er cheek agin my cheek
We useter watch the steamers an’ the hathis [elephants] pilin’ teak.
Elephints a-pilin’ teak
In the sludgy, squidgy creek,
Where the silence ‘ung that ‘eavy you was ‘arf afraid to speak!
On the road to Mandalay…

But that’s all shove be’ind me – long ago an’ fur away
An’ there ain’t no ‘busses runnin’ from the Bank to Mandalay;
An’ I’m learnin’ ‘ere in London what the ten-year soldier tells:
“If you’ve ‘eard the East a-callin’, you won’t never ‘eed naught else.”
No! you won’t ‘eed nothin’ else
But them spicy garlic smells,
An’ the sunshine an’ the palm-trees an’ the tinkly temple-bells;
On the road to Mandalay…

I am sick o’ wastin’ leather on these gritty pavin’-stones,
An’ the blasted English drizzle wakes the fever in my bones;
Tho’ I walks with fifty ‘ousemaids outer Chelsea to the Strand,
An’ they talks a lot o’ lovin’, but wot do they understand?
Beefy face an’ grubby ‘and –
Law! wot do they understand?
I’ve a neater, sweeter maiden in a cleaner, greener land!
On the road to Mandalay…

Ship me somewheres east of Suez, where the best is like the worst,
Where there aren’t no Ten Commandments an’ a man can raise a thirst;
For the temple-bells are callin’, an’ it’s there that I would be
By the old Moulmein Pagoda, looking lazy at the sea;
On the road to Mandalay,
Where the old Flotilla lay,
With our sick beneath the awnings when we went to Mandalay!
O the road to Mandalay,
Where the flyin’-fishes play,
An’ the dawn comes up like thunder outer China ‘crost the Bay!

Drink jij geregeld koffie en spreek je naast Nederlands ook Engels?

Drink jij geregeld koffie en spreek je naast Nederlands ook Engels? Dan is dit experiment iets voor jou!

Wij doen een studie naar het effect van cafeïne op reactietijd.. Als je meedoet krijg je ofwel een capsule met cafeïne (3 mg per kilo lichaamsgewicht), of een capsule met een placebo. Bijvoorbeeld, als je 65 kilo weegt, krijg je 195 mg cafeïne, wat overeenkomt met 2 kopjes koffie. Om je veiligheid te garanderen zal je nooit meer cafeïne binnenkrijgen dan wat  de Europese Voedselveiligheidsauthoriteit heeft bepaald als veilig om dagelijks te consumeren. Elke participant hoeft maar één keer een sessie van 1.5 uur te doen. Het experiment bestaat uit een serie reactietijdexperimenten voor en na cafeïne inname, een kleine enquête, en een Engelse taaltest. Alle experimenten zullen in de multimediazalen van het Harmoniegebouw plaatsvinden.

Voorwaarden om mee te doen

  • Je eerste taal is Nederlands
  • Je hebt geen medische aandoeningen, en in het bijzonder geen intolerantie voor cafeïne
  • Je drinkt geregeld koffie, maar niet extreem veel (Niet meer dan 4 koppen per dag gemiddeld)
  • Je bent tussen de 18 en 25 jaar oud
  • Je bent bereid alle vormen van cafeïne 24 uur voor het experiment op te geven
  • Je bent bereid tot 12 uur na het experiment geen koffie te drinken
  • Je bent rechtshandig

Als je geïnteresseerd bent, vul dan alsjeblieft de korte enquête op Qualtrics in op

https://qtrial2017q1az1.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_elE0Y3adnYS9lul

Voel je vrij een email te sturen naar jellebrouwer96@gmail.com indien je nog vragen hebt.

Stephen Greenblatt: Original Sinner?

It makes sense that Cultural Studies has succeeded the New Historicism at the top of the humanities heap, because it’s even more unserious, even more indefinable, even more open to recherché (not to say inane and capricious) topics of “study”; to an even greater extent than the New Historicists, the typical practitioner of Cultural Studies combines a breathtaking cultural and historical illiteracy with a tendency to lean on pseudo-radical tropes about Western imperialism and so forth. In sum, it’s an intellectual and scholarly disaster. And its spiritual father is Stephen Greenblatt.

Stephen Greenblatt is one of the best know literary critics and the editor of The Norton Anthology. Not everone is a fan though.

Article in New Criterion

New Professor of Modern English Literature

prof. dr. R.D.P. (Richard) Lansdown

There is a new face in the English Department. Prof. Richard Lansdowne has joined the staff having come from Australia. Born in the UK and educated at UCL, he is an expert on Romantic literature and has written extensively in this area. He is particularly interested in Austen, Byron, Keats, Shelley and Wordsworth. In his sojourn in Australia he also developed research interests in western ideas of the Pacific. He is readjusting his ideas of Geography to encompass the province of Groningen.