Deaths of the Poets

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What is the cost of poetry? Must poets be melancholic, doomed and self-destructive? Or is this just a myth? In our new Book of the Week, Michael Symmons Roberts and Paul Farley – both award winning poets themselves – explore that very question through a series of journeys across Britain, America and Europe.

This BBC Radio 4 series is currently being broadcast in 15 min episodes that are available for 28 days from now.

Realism and Racism

An excerpt from a message from a recent graduate, now living in the UK, where there is a debate about the importance of the ethnicity of actors and questions of authenticity.


I thought this might be of interest:

https://www.thestage.co.uk/news/2017/julian-fellowes-agree-odd-not-diverse-cast-half-sixpence/?utm_content=buffer36dfc&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer

There’s been a lot of talk in the theatre circles here about casting, in period dramas and otherwise, as well as discussions and protests about cultural appropriation (for example the protests against Howard Barker’s play: https://www.thestage.co.uk/news/2016/londons-print-room-criticised-for-racist-casting-in-chinese-roles/), with most people making sweeping statements about the ‘purpose’ of theatre, and what it ‘should’ do.

Thomas Nashe Conference: London

Thomas Nashe: Prose, Drama, and the Oral Culture of Early Modern London

An AHRC funded event jointly organised by The Thomas Nashe Project and Shakespeare’s Globe.

Saturday 20th May 2017

The Thomas Nashe Project is hosting a one-day symposium exploring the relationship between prose and drama, orality and print (and much more)!

The day will conclude with a ‘Read Not Dead’ staged reading of Thomas Nashe’s unsettling and disturbing prose work, Terrors of the Night, a story of nightmares and evil spirits told by candlelight in The Sam Wanamaker Playhouse.

The reading will be directed by Dr Tom Cornford (Royal Central School of Speech and Drama). The script has been adapted by Dr Kate De Rycker (Newcastle University), who will also introduce it.

You are welcome to come to either event or both.

The symposium is free but registration is necessary. Please contact Prof. Andrew Hadfield, University of Sussex (a.hadfield@sussex.ac.uk).

Tickets for the Read not Dead event (£20; £10) can be bought from Globe Education:

http://www.shakespearesglobe.com/education/events/symposia-conferences/thomas-nashehttp://www.shakespearesglobe.com/education/events/symposia-conferences/thomas-nashe

The Role of the University: A Chinese Government Perspective

Xi calls for more thought control on China’s campuses‘ – this may look like a hostile newspaper headline, but it is from The South China Morning Post, a major Hong Kong paper that is not considered inimical to the government: ‘Xi’s remarks are part of an ongoing ideological campaign in academia. A year ago, then minister of education Yuan Guiren declared Western values “not suitable for class”, causing an outcry at home and concern overseas.’

‘Xi Calls for Universities to Be Communist “Strongholds”’ from The China Digital Times.

‘China: Xi calls for stricter ideological control of universities’ from the BBC

‘China’s vice president orders more thought control over students’ from The Telegraph: ‘Mr Xi… also told university chiefs to closely monitor lecturers, especially those starting their academic careers. ‘

One of the underlying beliefs of these announcements is the importance of universities in society.